PLEASE DON’T BE SHOCKED . . .when I say I’m an atheist

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I always like to point out to people that there are many famous atheists in every profession. To demonstrate that fact, I have prepared a short list of classical composers, many of whom were obliged to create religious music simply to pay their bills, yet they were sincere atheists. Why are there so many atheist composers?

You might expect scientists to be atheists because they haven’t found any proof that there is a God. However, I think many “creative types” may be predisposed to atheism as well. This is pure speculation on my part (or possibly the ramblings of an idiot savant). I think the creative process allows the mind to explore all possibilities – including the denial of the existence of a supernatural being. Once accomplished, that denial sure eliminates a ton of spiritual baggage.

I have included several modern atheist composers as well, just to see if you can find them in the list.

THE LIST:

Béla Bartók

Hector Berlioz

Georges Bizet

Johannes Brahms

Claude Debussy

Frederick Delius

Brian Eno

Leoš Janáček

Tom Lehrer

Tim Minchin

Sergei Prokofiev

Sergei Rachmaninoff

Maurice Ravel

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

Richard Rodgers

Camille Saint-Saëns

Franz Peter Schubert

Dmitri Shostakovitch

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Richard Wagner

Vaughan Williams

Frank Zappa
(yes, he was a serious composer of modern classical music)

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SEX After Religion – II

(Updated/totally revised post from 2012,
with additional cartoons & a video with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry)

 

SEX After Religion – II
by Ron Steelman
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“Sex Improves Dramatically After Leaving Religion”

Religions claim to be good and good for you. But first they require you to accept their view of the world. They demand a belief in their god; belief in that God’s sacred book; belief in that god’s explanation of how to seek redemption (because we’ve been told relentlessly that we’re bad); belief in the promise of heaven and the threat of hell; belief in peculiar dietary laws; some, even a belief that your genitals should be altered in a certain way. Let’s face it, many religions tell you how, when, and with whom to have sex. . . or not to have sex.

Yes, for some reason sex is very important to the gods. In fact, they’ve laid out many dos and don’ts, and described various sexual taboos.

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From the very beginning, the god in my Bible told me that when Adam made love with Eve, it was bad, bad, bad. The two of them must be punished (although poor Eve got most of the blame). The act of sex was declared bad from the outset and you’d better feel guilty about it. Thus, we have religion to thank for the linking of guilt to sex. Thank you so much, god.

Unfortunately, begging our god to be forgiven for our sexual sins then sadly morphed into begging for sex. 

For Men
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For Women
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Resist

Sex continues to be incredibly important to religionists today. From anti-abortion to anti-homosexual, from Catholic priest and nun celibacy to priestly pedophilia, anti-masturbation to anti-sex before marriage – religions seem obsessed with trying to control sex. I, however, am now a secular humanist. I simply like to say that I’m “Post‐Theological.” I have exorcised that hideous religious guilt
that attempted to infect me. 

GoodSexFairy
The New Survey

Happily, a new survey has confirmed my personal experience. The headline in the newspaper read, “Sex Improves Dramatically After Leaving Religion.” The survey/study is by Dr. Darrel W. Ray, a psychologist, and director of The Institute for Performance Culture, and Amanda Brown. The survey title is “Sex and Secularism: What Happens When You Leave Religion.”

They surveyed over 14,500 American Secularists. It’s a ground‐breaking study of sexuality among the non‐religious. As stated in the editorial comment of the study, “. . .almost all religions suppress and distort sexuality in measurable increments. While most religions do not have as powerful an impact as a cult, they still have a negative impact in terms of guilt.”

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The survey gave plenty of data to make some tentative conclusions about the secular community and secular sex. The most important finding shows dramatic improvement in sexual satisfaction and a decrease in guilt after people left their religions.

I suggest that the conclusion we should draw from this new survey data is: if you want better sex, become a secularist. Good sex is part of a good life. Enjoy!

The Full Survey

Sex_and_Secularism

Education

In the US, many religious leaders are against sex education in schools and insist that parents and churches should be primarily responsible. Back in 1989, Hugh Laurie (from the U.S. television show House) had a skit-comedy TV show in England. Along with his old college buddy, Stephen Fry, they happily mocked how many parents resist teaching their children about sex, and object to the schools teaching it as well. 

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Finale: X-rated Humor

For adults only: what do atheists say in bed? The link below will take you to Jeff Swenson’s “Humanists in Love” comic. Don’t look at this if you are easily offended by sexual humor:

Jeff Swenson’s
“HUMANISTS IN LOVE – Deist on Top”

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(Thanks to The New Yorker and those wonderful New Yorker cartoonists)

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Oh, God. . .Oh, God. . .Oh, God!

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If you grew up with a God, I know she’s pretty hard to let go of. However, once you do, you’re free to just be a good human being.

It’s so rewarding to be free of “all gods and all masters. ” And to prove it, I love to say that I’m a devout atheist (just for the shock value – LOL). But most importantly, my real goad is to be a good person, a Secular Humanist.

Question: did you flinch when I used the word, “Secular?” Some people tell me that’s an off-putting word, because it’s somehow associated with atheists, and we all know you atheists are “Godless, evil people with no morals.” Of course, that position is espoused primarily by Christian fundamentalists, who don’t understand that they don’t need a god to keep them on the straight and narrow. Maybe they do. They think because atheists don’t believe in God, atheists are capable of just going off willfully, raping and pillaging across the countryside. (Really?!) Religious people are so desperate to keep you in the fold. For example, Muslims in a large part of the world even believe that they must kill apostates, those that quit the religion. As stand-up comics might say, “Tough room.”

As a cornerstone of our democracy our founders included “Freedom of Religion.” You have the right to reject any or all faith, or any or all gods.  You know what an atheist is, don’t you? Answer: someone who doesn’t believe in your god. You simply need to be your “own good self.” Practice using your empathy and compassion for other people. Out of that you will likely become a very moral person, perhaps a secular humanist.

So what’s a good definition of Humanism? Here are two:

Humanism is a progressive lifestance that, without supernaturalism, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead meaningful, ethical lives capable of adding to the greater good of humanity.
– American Humanist Association

But look at the second one as well. It reveals many more aspects of Secular Humanism to ponder. You will see that Humanists are actively trying to be good humans. That’s why we say you can be “Good Without God.” Here’s how. I also like the emphasis of the arts, which can be vehicles to understanding how to be a better person. It has one of my favorite lines as well: “Humanism is a philosophy of those in love with life.” (a quote from prominent humanist, Fred Edwords quote, I think). And finally, it has a kick-ass finish. Humanism is:

A joyous alternative to religions that believe in a supernatural god and life in a hereafter. Humanists believe that this is the only life of which we have certain knowledge and that we owe it to ourselves and others to make it the best life possible for ourselves and all with whom we share this fragile planet. A belief that when people are free to think for themselves, using reason and knowledge as their tools, they are best able to solve this world’s problems. An appreciation of the art, literature, music and crafts that are our heritage from the past and of the creativity that, if nourished, can continuously enrich our lives. Humanism is, in sum, a philosophy of those in love with life. Humanists take responsibility for their own lives and relish the adventure of being part of new discoveries, seeking new knowledge, exploring new options. Instead of finding solace in prefabricated answers to the great questions of life, humanists enjoy the open-endedness of a quest and the freedom of discovery that this entails.
– The Humanist Society of Western New York

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“So far, I’ve changed my mind twice about God”

I’ve been visiting some old familiar websites, hoping to reactivate my gray matter after months of recovery from two spine surgeries and too many pain killers. After a while I stumbled across the question The Edge Foundation asked of ten prominent people from the worlds of science, philosophy, psychology, and physics: “What have you changed your mind about?” The answers were inspiring.

Alan Alda

ALAN ALDA

Not surprisingly, the great thinkers who answered the question included Alan Alda, who hosted the television shows “Scientific American Frontiers” (1993–2007) and “The Human Spark” (2010). Although he is an accomplished actor, he has always loved science and learned much during eleven years of interviewing six or seven hundred scientists around the world. His answer encouraged me to think, and change my mind.

(Below is from Alan Alda’s 2008 essay for The Edge Foundation)

“So far, I’ve changed my mind twice about God”

“Until I was twenty I was sure there was a being who could see everything I did and who didn’t like most of it. He seemed to care about minute aspects of my life, like on what day of the week I ate a piece of meat. And yet, he let earthquakes and mudslides take out whole communities, apparently ignoring the saints among them who ate their meat on the assigned days.  Eventually, I realized that I didn’t believe there was such a being. It didn’t seem reasonable. And I assumed that I was an atheist. 

As I understood the word, it meant that I was someone who didn’t believe in a God; I was without a God. I didn’t broadcast this in public because I noticed that people who do believe in a god get upset to hear that others don’t.. . .”

“. . .I still don’t like the word agnostic. It’s too fancy. I’m simply not a believer. But, as simple as this notion is, it confuses some people. Someone wrote a Wikipedia entry about me, identifying me as an atheist because I’d said in a book I wrote that I wasn’t a believer. . .”
— Alan Alda

Inspired by Mr. Alda’s comments, I had to ask the question, “am I still an Atheist?” In my post from last month I reiterated my self-labeling by explaining what I’ve been saying for 25 years, “I’m an Atheist, but more importantly, I’m a Secular Humanist.”

But ya know, Alda’s onto something. I’m so frustrated by having to explain the various definitions of the word “Atheist.” I’m tired of seeing the shocked stares when I proudly say that I’m a devout Atheist. I do so enjoy riling people up by using the word devout next to the word Atheist. However, I’d much rather focus my efforts on talking about Secular Humanism. Perhaps they will listen if I didn’t use the “A” word?

So after 25 years I’m changing my mind. Like Mr. Alda I’m content to label myself simply as a non believer. But now I must try it on and wear it around for a while. I can’t wait to test it on my friends. . .and certainly in public!

Are you an Atheist or a non believer?


The 2015 question at The Edge is “What Do You Think About Machines That Think?” There are 186 individual, printable responses. Ideas. Ideas. Ideas!

http://edge.org/responses/q2015


Why Ricky Gervais is an Atheist (or, Non Believer, if you will)

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